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COMPLETE THOUGHT
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ALMOST THERE! NEEDS FEEDBACK AND TIME
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THIS COULD PASS AS A COMPLETE THOUGHT
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I COULD STOP HERE WITH ONLY MILD EMBARRASSMENT
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ROUGH DRAFT IN NEED OF EDITING
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HALF DECENT BUT IN THE VALLEY OF DESPAIR
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ALL THE KEY POINTS (POORLY WRITTEN)
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HALF-WRITTEN PARAGRAPHS / UNFINISHED ORDERING
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SUMMARY OF ROUGH THOUGHTS
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TITLE AND NOTE TO SELF
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Before I started as a UX designer at Spire, I got a lot of great advice from seasoned designers on how to impress at a first design job.

Their most helpful pointers were not directly related to the trade, but instead about the things that surrounded it: meetings, relationships, and evangelizing design work.

I distilled these into this talk I gave to UX designers at Tradecraft San Francisco, delivered at the end of their program before they start their first design jobs.

If I were to give the talk again, I’d also talk about impostor syndrome. While it never fully goes away, there are good ways to manage it and prevent it from getting in the way of your work—and even to use it as motivation to improve.